News and Events

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Advanced Training in Nephrology Clinical Fellowship Program

The Division of Nephrology, University of British Columbia is pleased to offer a position in the Advanced Training in Nephrology Clinical Fellowship Program.

This Fellowship is a post-certification program, and is open to those who have completed at least 2 years of nephrology in an accredited training program. A certificate from UBC Division of Nephrology will be issued upon completion of the 12 month program.

Learn more>>

Glomerulonephritis (GN) Fellowship training program: 2019-2021

The Division of Nephrology, Department of Medicine at the University of British Columbia invites applications for a Glomerulonephritis (GN) Fellowship training program: 2019-2021.

This is a 2-year fellowship offered through collaboration of the BC Provincial Renal Agency and the UBC Division of Nephrology.  Salary-support funding is available.

See the full posting >>

Remembering the forgotten non-communicable diseases

Research by: Alan D Lopez1, Thomas N Williams, Adeera Levin, Marcello Tonelli, Jasvinder A Singh, Peter GJ Burney, Jürgen Rehm, Nora D Volkow, George Koob and Cleusa P Ferri

Journal: BMC Medicine 2014, 12:200

The forthcoming post-Millennium Development Goals era will bring about new challenges in global health. Low- and middle-income countries will have to contend with a dual burden of infectious and non-communicable diseases (NCDs). Some of these NCDs, such as neoplasms, COPD, cardiovascular diseases and diabetes, cause much health loss worldwide and are already widely recognised as doing so. However, 55% of the global NCD burden arises from other NCDs, which tend to be ignored in terms of premature mortality and quality of life reduction. Here, experts in some of these ‘forgotten NCDs’ review the clinical impact of these diseases along with the consequences of their ignoring their medical importance, and discuss ways in which they can be given higher global health priority in order to decrease the growing burden of disease and disability.

Remembering the forgotten non-communicable diseases (PDF)

World Kidney Day 2014

Start the day with a glass of water.World Kidney Day aims to raise awareness of the importance of our kidneys to our overall health and to reduce the frequency and impact of kidney disease and its associated health problems worldwide. The year, the theme is Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) and aging.  UBC Nephrology is proud to be a part of World Kidney Day and the Kidney Health Month.

Related sites

World Kidney Day

BC Renal Agency

Kidney Foundation of Canada

Landsberg recognized by Canadian Society of Transplantation

UBC Nephrology’s Dr. David Landsberg was awarded the Canadian Society of Transplantation Clinical Achievement Award at the 2014 Canadian Society of Transplantation Annual Scientific Meeting in Montreal.

David has led the development of the kidney transplant program at St. Paul’s Hospital from its inception, and has been instrumental in ensuring that the transplant program is internationally recognized for its innovations in living kidney donation.

David’s leadership extends beyond the clinical realm– he has been an outstanding mentor with several trainees now in academic or clinical leadership positions in Canada including Drs. Kathryn Tinckam (University of Toronto), as well as John Gill,  Jagbir Gill, and Olwyn Johnston (all of UBC).

Congratulations David!

BC Kidney Days

BC KIdney Days

Compassion in Kidney Care: From Patients to Providers, the annual BC Kidney Days conference hosted by the BC Renal Agency and BC Transplant, is being held on October 24-25, 2013 at the Sheraton Wall Centre in Vancouver. Full conference details, including registration information is available at the BC Kidney Days web site.

 

Quantification of the Early Risk of Death in Elderly Kidney Transplant Recipients

Research by: J.S. Gill(1,2,3), E. Schaeffner(4), S. Chadban(5), J. Dong(1), C. Rose(1), O. Johnston(1) and J.Gill(1,2) of (1) the Division of Nephrology, The University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, (2) Tufts-New England Medical Centre, Boston, MA, USA, (3) the Centre for Health Evaluation and Outcome Sciences, St. Paul’s Hospital, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, (4) Division of Nephrology, Charitie University Medicine, Campus Virchow Klinikum, Berlin, Germany, and (5) the University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia.

Journal: American Journal of Transplantation

As our ESRD population ages, care strategies need to be reassessed to optimize care across the spectrum of our patients. This study sheds light on the risks and benefits of transplantation in patient > 65 year old. Examining outcomes of standard and extended criteria cadaveric transplantation as well as low and intermediate risk living donor transplantation the study demonstrates differences in long term survivial with living donation providing superior outcomes in patients > 65. These data show the need for future research into ways to minimize mortality risk in this population as well as providing important information to inform patients in transplantation decision making.

Quantification of the Early Risk of Death in Elderly Kidney Transplant Recipients (PDF)

Responsiveness of FGF-23 and mineral metabolism to altered dietary phosphate intake in chronic kidney disease (CKD)

Research by: Mhairi Sigrist(1), Mila Tang(1), Monica Beaulieu(1,2), Gabriella Espino-Hernandez(2), Lee Er(2), Ognjenka Djurdjev(2) and Adeera Levin (1,2) of (1) the Division of Nephrology, The University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, (2) Statistics and Methodology, BC Provincial Renal Agency, British Columbia, Canada.

Journal: Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation

FGF-23 is a fibroblast growth factor involved in phosphate metabolism and regulation of plasma phosphate levels. Elevations in FGF-23 in CKD and ESRD patients have been linked to worse outcomes. This carefully conducted dietary intervention study demonstrates the ability of a low phosphate diet to lower FGF-23 levels in a CKD population as well as healthy controls and informs future research into potential clinical benefit of targeting lower FGF-23 levels in CKD.

Responsiveness of FGF-23 and mineral metabolism to altered dietary phosphate intake in chronic kidney disease (CKD) (PDF)

Optimizing AVF creation prior to dialysis start: the role of predialysis renal replacement therapy choices

Research by: Jennifer Hanko(1,2), Alexandra Romann(3), Paul Taylor(1), Michael Copland(1) and Monica Beaulieu(1,3) of (1) the Division of Nephrology, The University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, (2) Regional Nephrology Unit, Belfast City Hospital, Belfast, UK and (3) BC Provincial Renal Agency, British Columbia, Canada.

Journal: Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation

This interesting study of BC patients examined all patients starting dialysis over a two-year period to explore the role of pre-dialysis modality choice on AVF creation rates prior to dialysis start. The authors demonstrated nearly half of all dialysis starts did not have a prior modality choice understandably leading to lower AVF creation rates. Additionally, of those who did choose PD first the presence of cardiovascular disease and lower serum albumin levels correlated with starting HD instead and consequently lower AVF creation rates before dialysis start. This study informs future research to identify factors that impact on patient modality selection to better guide predialysis education and modality choice and optimize most appropriate modality selection and access creation.

Optimizing AVF creation prior to dialysis start: the role of predialysis renal replacement therapy choices (PDF)